: ABSTRACTCognitive impairments figure prominently in COVID-19 survivors. Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) improves functional outcomes reducing long-term cognitive deficits in several neurological and psychiatric conditions. Our case-control study investigates the efficacy of a CRT programme administered to COVID-19 survivors in the post-acute phase of the illness. Seventy-three COVID-19 survivors presenting cognitive impairments at one-month follow-up were enrolled. Among them, 15 patients were treated with a two-month CRT programme, and 30 non-treated patients were matched conditional to their baseline cognitive functioning. Cognitive functions were assessed before and after treatment. Depression and quality of life were also evaluated. Mixed model ANOVA revealed a significant effect over time of the CRT programme on global cognitive functioning (F = 4.56, p = 0.039), while no significant effect was observed in the untreated group. We observed a significant effect of the improvement in verbal fluency (χ2 = 7.20, p = 0.007) and executive functions (χ2 = 13.63, p < 0.001) on quality of life. A positive significant correlation was found between depressive symptomatology and verbal fluency (r = -0.35), working memory (r = -0.44), psychomotor coordination (r  = -0.42), and executive functions (r  = -0.33). Our results could pave the way to a plausible innovative treatment targeting cognitive impairments and ameliorating the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors.

Cognitive remediation therapy for post-acute persistent cognitive deficits in COVID-19 survivors: A proof-of-concept study / Palladini, Mariagrazia; Bravi, Beatrice; Colombo, Federica; Caselani, Elisa; Di Pasquasio, Camilla; D'Orsi, Greta; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Poletti, Sara; Benedetti, Francesco; Mazza, Mario Gennaro. - In: NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION. - ISSN 0960-2011. - (2022), pp. 1-18-18. [Epub ahead of print] [10.1080/09602011.2022.2075016]

Cognitive remediation therapy for post-acute persistent cognitive deficits in COVID-19 survivors: A proof-of-concept study

Palladini, Mariagrazia;Bravi, Beatrice;Colombo, Federica;Rovere-Querini, Patrizia;Benedetti, Francesco;Mazza, Mario Gennaro
2022-01-01

Abstract

: ABSTRACTCognitive impairments figure prominently in COVID-19 survivors. Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) improves functional outcomes reducing long-term cognitive deficits in several neurological and psychiatric conditions. Our case-control study investigates the efficacy of a CRT programme administered to COVID-19 survivors in the post-acute phase of the illness. Seventy-three COVID-19 survivors presenting cognitive impairments at one-month follow-up were enrolled. Among them, 15 patients were treated with a two-month CRT programme, and 30 non-treated patients were matched conditional to their baseline cognitive functioning. Cognitive functions were assessed before and after treatment. Depression and quality of life were also evaluated. Mixed model ANOVA revealed a significant effect over time of the CRT programme on global cognitive functioning (F = 4.56, p = 0.039), while no significant effect was observed in the untreated group. We observed a significant effect of the improvement in verbal fluency (χ2 = 7.20, p = 0.007) and executive functions (χ2 = 13.63, p < 0.001) on quality of life. A positive significant correlation was found between depressive symptomatology and verbal fluency (r = -0.35), working memory (r = -0.44), psychomotor coordination (r  = -0.42), and executive functions (r  = -0.33). Our results could pave the way to a plausible innovative treatment targeting cognitive impairments and ameliorating the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors.
2022
Cognitive impairment
Cognitive remediation therapy
Covid-19
Depression
SARS-CoV-2
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/129201
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