After middle age, in human bone, the resorption usually exceeds formation resulting in bone loss and increased risk of fractures in the aged population. Only few in vivo models in higher vertebrates are available for pathogenic and therapeutic studies about bone aging. Among these, maleDanio rerio(zebrafish) can be successfully used as low vertebrate model to study degenerative alterations that affect the skeleton during aging, reducing the role of sex hormones. In this paper, we investigated the early bone aging mechanisms in male zebrafish (3, 6, 9 months old) scales evaluating the physiological changes and the effects of prednisolone, a pro-osteoporotic drug. The results evidentiated an age-dependent reduction of the mineralization rate in the fish scales, as highlighted by growing circle measurements. Indeed, the osteoblastic ALP activity at the matrix deposition site was found progressively downregulated. The higher TRAP activity was found in 63% of 9-month-old fish scales associated with resorption lacunae along the scale border. Gene expression analysis evidentiated that an increase of thetnfrsf1b(homolog of humanrank) in aging scales may be responsible for resorption stimulation. Interestingly, prednisolone inhibited the physiological growth of the scale and induced in aged scales a more significant bone resorption compared with untreated fish (3.8% vs 1.02%). Bone markers analysis shown a significant reduction of ALP/TRAP ratio due to a prednisolone-dependent stimulation oftnfsf11(homolog of humanrankl)in scales of older fish. The results evidentiated for the first time the presence of a senile male osteoporosis in lower vertebrate. This new model could be helpful to identify the early mechanisms of bone aging and new therapeutic strategies to prevent age-related bone alterations in humans.

Age-dependent modulation of bone metabolism in zebrafish scales as new model of male osteoporosis in lower vertebrates

Banfi, Giuseppe;
2021

Abstract

After middle age, in human bone, the resorption usually exceeds formation resulting in bone loss and increased risk of fractures in the aged population. Only few in vivo models in higher vertebrates are available for pathogenic and therapeutic studies about bone aging. Among these, maleDanio rerio(zebrafish) can be successfully used as low vertebrate model to study degenerative alterations that affect the skeleton during aging, reducing the role of sex hormones. In this paper, we investigated the early bone aging mechanisms in male zebrafish (3, 6, 9 months old) scales evaluating the physiological changes and the effects of prednisolone, a pro-osteoporotic drug. The results evidentiated an age-dependent reduction of the mineralization rate in the fish scales, as highlighted by growing circle measurements. Indeed, the osteoblastic ALP activity at the matrix deposition site was found progressively downregulated. The higher TRAP activity was found in 63% of 9-month-old fish scales associated with resorption lacunae along the scale border. Gene expression analysis evidentiated that an increase of thetnfrsf1b(homolog of humanrank) in aging scales may be responsible for resorption stimulation. Interestingly, prednisolone inhibited the physiological growth of the scale and induced in aged scales a more significant bone resorption compared with untreated fish (3.8% vs 1.02%). Bone markers analysis shown a significant reduction of ALP/TRAP ratio due to a prednisolone-dependent stimulation oftnfsf11(homolog of humanrankl)in scales of older fish. The results evidentiated for the first time the presence of a senile male osteoporosis in lower vertebrate. This new model could be helpful to identify the early mechanisms of bone aging and new therapeutic strategies to prevent age-related bone alterations in humans.
Aging
Bone
Osteoporosis
Scale
Zebrafish
Aged
Animals
Bone and Bones
Disease Models, Animal
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis
Zebrafish
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132092
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