Background and aims: Deep repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (deep rTMS) over the bilateral insula and prefrontal cortex (PFC) can promote weight-loss in obesity, preventing cardiometabolic complications as Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). To investigate the changes in the functional brain integration after dTMS, we conducted a resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) study in obesity.Methods and results: This preliminary study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, sham controlled study: 9 participants were treated with high-frequency stimulation (realTMS group), 8 were sham-treated (shamTMS group). Out of the 17 enrolled patients, 6 were affected by T2D. Resting-state fMRI scans were acquired at baseline (T0) and after the 5-week intervention (T1). Body weight was measured at three time points [T0, T1, 1-month follow-up visit (FU1)]. A mixed-model analysis showed a significant group-by-time interaction for body weight (p Z .04), with a significant decrease (p < .001) in the realTMS group. The rsFC data revealed a significant increase of degree centrality for the realTMS group in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and a significant decrease in the occipital pole.Conclusion: An increase of whole-brain functional connections of the mOFC, together with the decrease of whole-brain functional connections with the occipital pole, may reflect a brain mechanism behind weight-loss through a diminished reactivity to bottom-up visual-sensory processes in favor of increased reliance on top-down decision-making processes. Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03009695.(c) 2021 The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Repetitive deep TMS for the reduction of body weight: Bimodal effect on the functional brain connectivity in "diabesity"

Banfi, Giuseppe;
2021

Abstract

Background and aims: Deep repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (deep rTMS) over the bilateral insula and prefrontal cortex (PFC) can promote weight-loss in obesity, preventing cardiometabolic complications as Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). To investigate the changes in the functional brain integration after dTMS, we conducted a resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) study in obesity.Methods and results: This preliminary study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, sham controlled study: 9 participants were treated with high-frequency stimulation (realTMS group), 8 were sham-treated (shamTMS group). Out of the 17 enrolled patients, 6 were affected by T2D. Resting-state fMRI scans were acquired at baseline (T0) and after the 5-week intervention (T1). Body weight was measured at three time points [T0, T1, 1-month follow-up visit (FU1)]. A mixed-model analysis showed a significant group-by-time interaction for body weight (p Z .04), with a significant decrease (p < .001) in the realTMS group. The rsFC data revealed a significant increase of degree centrality for the realTMS group in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and a significant decrease in the occipital pole.Conclusion: An increase of whole-brain functional connections of the mOFC, together with the decrease of whole-brain functional connections with the occipital pole, may reflect a brain mechanism behind weight-loss through a diminished reactivity to bottom-up visual-sensory processes in favor of increased reliance on top-down decision-making processes. Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03009695.(c) 2021 The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Food craving
Functional connectivity
Obesity
Type 2 diabetes
fMRI
Adult
Brain
Brain Mapping
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Middle Aged
Neural Pathways
Obesity
Reward
Treatment Outcome
Choice Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Weight Loss
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132101
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 9
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact