The benefits of early virtual-reality-based home rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have not yet been assessed. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to compare the efficacy of early rehabilitation via the Virtual Reality Rehabilitation System (VRRS) versus traditional rehabilitation in improving functional outcomes after THA. Subjects were randomized either to an experimental (VRRS; n = 21) or a control group (control; n = 22). All participants were invited to perform a daily home exercise program for rehabilitation after THA with different administration methods-namely, an illustrated booklet for the control group and a tablet with wearable sensors for the VRRS group. The primary outcome was the hip disability (HOOS JR). Secondary outcomes were the level of independence and the degree of global perceived effect of the rehabilitation program (GPE). Outcomes were measured before surgery (T0) and at the 4th (T1), 7th (T2), and 15th (T3) day after surgery. Mixed-model ANOVA showed no significant group effect but a significant effect of time for all variables (p < 0.001); no differences were observed in HOOS JR between VRRS and the control at T0, T1, T2, or T3. Further, no differences in the level of independence were found between VRRS and the control, whereas the GPE was higher at T3 in VRSS compared to the control (4.76 +/- 0.43 vs. 3.96 +/- 0.65; p < 0.001). Virtual-reality-based home rehabilitation resulted in similar improvements in functional outcomes with a better GPE compared to the traditional rehabilitation program following THA. The application of new technologies could offer novel possibilities for service delivery in rehabilitation.

Early Virtual-Reality-Based Home Rehabilitation after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Banfi, Giuseppe;
2022

Abstract

The benefits of early virtual-reality-based home rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have not yet been assessed. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to compare the efficacy of early rehabilitation via the Virtual Reality Rehabilitation System (VRRS) versus traditional rehabilitation in improving functional outcomes after THA. Subjects were randomized either to an experimental (VRRS; n = 21) or a control group (control; n = 22). All participants were invited to perform a daily home exercise program for rehabilitation after THA with different administration methods-namely, an illustrated booklet for the control group and a tablet with wearable sensors for the VRRS group. The primary outcome was the hip disability (HOOS JR). Secondary outcomes were the level of independence and the degree of global perceived effect of the rehabilitation program (GPE). Outcomes were measured before surgery (T0) and at the 4th (T1), 7th (T2), and 15th (T3) day after surgery. Mixed-model ANOVA showed no significant group effect but a significant effect of time for all variables (p < 0.001); no differences were observed in HOOS JR between VRRS and the control at T0, T1, T2, or T3. Further, no differences in the level of independence were found between VRRS and the control, whereas the GPE was higher at T3 in VRSS compared to the control (4.76 +/- 0.43 vs. 3.96 +/- 0.65; p < 0.001). Virtual-reality-based home rehabilitation resulted in similar improvements in functional outcomes with a better GPE compared to the traditional rehabilitation program following THA. The application of new technologies could offer novel possibilities for service delivery in rehabilitation.
arthroplasty
exercise
hip
home-based
rehabilitation
virtual reality
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132172
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