Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for COVID-19, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the role of adiponectin (an anti-inflammatory adipokine), leptin (a pro-inflammatory adipokine) and their ratio (Adpn/Lep) in this context. Design: Single-centre, prospective observational study. Methods. Adiponectin and leptin were measured in 60 COVID-19 patients with mild (not hospitalised, n=11), moderate (hospitalised but not requiring intensive care, n=25) and severe (admission to the intensive care unit [ICU] or death, n=24) disease. Results: Adiponectin and leptin levels were similar across severity groups, but patients with moderate severity had the highest Adpn/Lep ratio (1.2 [0.5; 2.0], 5.0 [1.6; 11.2], 2.1 [1.0; 3.6] in mild, moderate and severe disease; P = 0.019). Adpn/Lep, but not adiponectin or leptin alone, correlated with systemic inflammation (C reactive protein, CRP: Spearman's rho 0.293, P = 0.023). When dividing patients into Adpn/Lep tertiles, adiponectin was highest, whereas leptin was lowest in the third (highest) tertile. Patients in the highest Adpn/Lep tertile had numerically lower rates of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and lower rates of death or admission to ICU versus other tertiles. At linear regression in the whole cohort, CRP significantly predicted Adpn/Lep (β 0.291, P = 0.022), while female gender (β -0.289, P = 0.016), diabetes (β -0.257, P = 0.028), and hypertension (β -239, P = 0.043) were negative predictors. Conclusions: We speculate that the rise in Adpn/Lep, due to increased adiponectin and reduced leptin, is a compensatory response to systemic inflammation. In patients with worse cardiometabolic health (e.g. diabetes, hypertension) this mechanism might be blunted, possibly contributing to higher mortality.

Adiponectin to leptin ratio reflects inflammatory burden and survival in COVID-19: Adiponectin and leptin in COVID-19 / Di Filippo, L.; De Lorenzo, R.; Sciorati, C.; Capobianco, A.; Lore, N. I.; Giustina, A.; Manfredi, A. A.; Rovere-Querini, P.; Conte, C.. - In: DIABETES & METABOLISM. - ISSN 1262-3636. - 47:6(2021), p. 101268. [10.1016/j.diabet.2021.101268]

Adiponectin to leptin ratio reflects inflammatory burden and survival in COVID-19: Adiponectin and leptin in COVID-19

Di Filippo L.;De Lorenzo R.;Giustina A.;Manfredi A. A.;Rovere-Querini P.;Conte C.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for COVID-19, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the role of adiponectin (an anti-inflammatory adipokine), leptin (a pro-inflammatory adipokine) and their ratio (Adpn/Lep) in this context. Design: Single-centre, prospective observational study. Methods. Adiponectin and leptin were measured in 60 COVID-19 patients with mild (not hospitalised, n=11), moderate (hospitalised but not requiring intensive care, n=25) and severe (admission to the intensive care unit [ICU] or death, n=24) disease. Results: Adiponectin and leptin levels were similar across severity groups, but patients with moderate severity had the highest Adpn/Lep ratio (1.2 [0.5; 2.0], 5.0 [1.6; 11.2], 2.1 [1.0; 3.6] in mild, moderate and severe disease; P = 0.019). Adpn/Lep, but not adiponectin or leptin alone, correlated with systemic inflammation (C reactive protein, CRP: Spearman's rho 0.293, P = 0.023). When dividing patients into Adpn/Lep tertiles, adiponectin was highest, whereas leptin was lowest in the third (highest) tertile. Patients in the highest Adpn/Lep tertile had numerically lower rates of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and lower rates of death or admission to ICU versus other tertiles. At linear regression in the whole cohort, CRP significantly predicted Adpn/Lep (β 0.291, P = 0.022), while female gender (β -0.289, P = 0.016), diabetes (β -0.257, P = 0.028), and hypertension (β -239, P = 0.043) were negative predictors. Conclusions: We speculate that the rise in Adpn/Lep, due to increased adiponectin and reduced leptin, is a compensatory response to systemic inflammation. In patients with worse cardiometabolic health (e.g. diabetes, hypertension) this mechanism might be blunted, possibly contributing to higher mortality.
2021
Adiponectin
Diabetes
Inflammation
Leptin
Obesity
SARS-CoV-2
Female
Humans
Inflammation
Male
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Adiponectin
COVID-19
Leptin
Adiponectin
Diabetes
Inflammation
Leptin
Obesity
SARS-CoV-2
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132292
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