Penile cancer is a growing health-care concern worldwide. Despite its rarity, penile cancer has a disproportionate impact on some countries, as the location with the highest incidences are invariably those with low resources and few registries or trials. In this Perspective, the authors discuss how global collaboration and centralization of care can help to improve management of penile cancer worldwide, but especially in areas where resources are limited.Rare tumours such as penile carcinoma have been largely neglected by the urology scientific community in favour of more common - and, therefore, more easily fundable - diseases. Nevertheless, penile cancer represents a rising burden for health-care systems around the world, because a lack of widespread expertise, ineffective centralization of care and absence of research funds have hampered our ability to improve the global care of these patients. Moreover, a dichotomy has arisen in the field of penile cancer, further impeding care: the countries that are mainly supporting research on this topic through the development of epidemiological studies and design of clinical trials are not the countries that have the highest prevalence of the disease. This situation means that randomized controlled trials in developed countries often do not meet the minimum accrual and are intended to close before reaching their end points, whereas trials are almost completely absent in those areas with the highest disease prevalence and probability of successful recruitment, such as Africa, South America and South Asia. The scientific and organizational inaction that arises owing to this mismatch translates into a burdensome cost for our patients. A global effort to gather experts and pull together scientific data from around the world may be the best way to boost clinical research, to change clinical practice and, ultimately, to improve care for patients and their families.

A global approach to improving penile cancer care

Bandini, Marco;Basile, Giuseppe;Leni, Riccardo;Cirulli, Giuseppe Ottone;Pederzoli, Filippo;Montorsi, Francesco;Necchi, Andrea;
2022

Abstract

Penile cancer is a growing health-care concern worldwide. Despite its rarity, penile cancer has a disproportionate impact on some countries, as the location with the highest incidences are invariably those with low resources and few registries or trials. In this Perspective, the authors discuss how global collaboration and centralization of care can help to improve management of penile cancer worldwide, but especially in areas where resources are limited.Rare tumours such as penile carcinoma have been largely neglected by the urology scientific community in favour of more common - and, therefore, more easily fundable - diseases. Nevertheless, penile cancer represents a rising burden for health-care systems around the world, because a lack of widespread expertise, ineffective centralization of care and absence of research funds have hampered our ability to improve the global care of these patients. Moreover, a dichotomy has arisen in the field of penile cancer, further impeding care: the countries that are mainly supporting research on this topic through the development of epidemiological studies and design of clinical trials are not the countries that have the highest prevalence of the disease. This situation means that randomized controlled trials in developed countries often do not meet the minimum accrual and are intended to close before reaching their end points, whereas trials are almost completely absent in those areas with the highest disease prevalence and probability of successful recruitment, such as Africa, South America and South Asia. The scientific and organizational inaction that arises owing to this mismatch translates into a burdensome cost for our patients. A global effort to gather experts and pull together scientific data from around the world may be the best way to boost clinical research, to change clinical practice and, ultimately, to improve care for patients and their families.
Africa
Humans
Male
Penile Neoplasms
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132680
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