Background. General population studies have shown that a large portion of people in developed countries have been exposed to at least one traumatic event in their lifetime. However, the development of trauma-related disorders (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder/Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is relatively rare. Thus, the evaluation and the early identification of trauma related disorders risk factors represent a relevant topic. The present study was aimed at investigating if dysfunctional personality traits and attachment styles represent risk factors for meeting the criteria of trauma-related disorders.Methodology. In a sample of 552 Italian community-dwelling adult participants we administered the International Trauma Questionnaire, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5-BF and the Attachment Style Questionnaire. Three hundred-sixty-five participants reported one or more traumatic experiences according to ICD-11 operationalization.Results. In our sample, the prevalence of trauma related disorders was 14.5%. Females and younger participants were significantly more likely to develop trauma related disorders. Moreover, the hierarchical logistic regression models showed that high level of Negative Affectivity and an anxious/ambivalent adult attachment style (Preoccupation with Relationship) increased the risk to meet trauma related disorders criteria. Finally, when we considered as covariates Negative Affectivity and Preoccupation with Relationship, only Negative Affectivity remained a significant predictor.Conclusion. As a whole, these results suggested the importance of dysfunctional personality features in trauma related disorders risk. In addition, an insecure attachment style characterized by an anxious and dependent approach to relationships represents a relevant aspect in order to prevent trauma related disorders.

The role of Dysfunctional Personality Features and Adult Attachment Style in Predicting ICD-11 Trauma Related Disorders in a Community- dwelling Sample

Serena Borroni
;
Giulia Ruotolo;Elisabetta Masci;Chiara Franzoni;Giulia Vassena;Andrea Fossati
2022

Abstract

Background. General population studies have shown that a large portion of people in developed countries have been exposed to at least one traumatic event in their lifetime. However, the development of trauma-related disorders (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder/Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is relatively rare. Thus, the evaluation and the early identification of trauma related disorders risk factors represent a relevant topic. The present study was aimed at investigating if dysfunctional personality traits and attachment styles represent risk factors for meeting the criteria of trauma-related disorders.Methodology. In a sample of 552 Italian community-dwelling adult participants we administered the International Trauma Questionnaire, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5-BF and the Attachment Style Questionnaire. Three hundred-sixty-five participants reported one or more traumatic experiences according to ICD-11 operationalization.Results. In our sample, the prevalence of trauma related disorders was 14.5%. Females and younger participants were significantly more likely to develop trauma related disorders. Moreover, the hierarchical logistic regression models showed that high level of Negative Affectivity and an anxious/ambivalent adult attachment style (Preoccupation with Relationship) increased the risk to meet trauma related disorders criteria. Finally, when we considered as covariates Negative Affectivity and Preoccupation with Relationship, only Negative Affectivity remained a significant predictor.Conclusion. As a whole, these results suggested the importance of dysfunctional personality features in trauma related disorders risk. In addition, an insecure attachment style characterized by an anxious and dependent approach to relationships represents a relevant aspect in order to prevent trauma related disorders.
Attachment
Clinical Psychology
Personality
Trauma related Disorder
ICD-11
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132796
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