Background and Objectives Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities suggestive of vasogenic edema or sulcal effusion (ARIA-E) are the most common adverse events complicating Alzheimer disease (AD) immunotherapy with anti-beta-amyloid (A beta) monoclonal antibodies. ARIA-E can also occur spontaneously in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri), a rare autoimmune encephalopathy associated with increased CSF levels of anti-A beta autoantibodies. Although the pathophysiologic mechanisms of ARIA-E remain to be fully elucidated, experimental evidence from ex vivo studies suggests that gantenerumab and aducanumab enable microglial activation. However, the in vivo evidence for a direct association between neuroinflammation and ARIA-E in patients with high CSF anti-A beta (auto)antibody levels has never been demonstrated. Methods The spatial distribution and temporal variations of microglial activation associated with levels of anti-A beta autoantibodies at (sub)acute presentation of ARIA-E and after corticosteroid therapy were evaluated in a longitudinal case series of patients with CAA-ri, the spontaneous variant of the iatrogenic ARIA-E reported in A beta-lowering immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies. Multimodal and multiparametric MRI was used for CAA and ARIA-E severity quantification, according to validated scoring system; CSF testing for anti-A beta autoantibodies and AD biomarkers; C-11-PK11195 PET for activated microglia. Results At (sub)acute presentation, we found focal peaks of microglial activation having a greater spatial colocalization with ARIA-E compared with chronic age-related white matter change imaging abnormalities. The severity of ARIA-E and the magnitude of the associated microglial activation were greater in patients having AD and severe CAA concomitant disease compared with patients having CAA only. CSF anti-A beta autoantibodies at presentation were high in all patients and markedly decreased at posttreatment follow-up, in parallel with clinical resolution of acute symptoms, reduced ARIA-E severity, and reduced microglial activation. Discussion Our findings extend the current notion of ARIA-E by providing the first in vivo C-11-PK11195 PET evidence for an association between microglial activation and the magnitude and severity of ARIA-E in patients with increased CSF concentration of anti-A beta autoantibodies and comorbid AD and CAA disease. Our results highlight CSF testing for anti-A beta autoantibodies as a promising diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy response biomarker to help guide future treatment and management decisions in real clinical practice and clinical trials.

Association of Microglial Activation With Spontaneous ARIA-E and CSF Levels of Anti-Aβ Autoantibodies

Caminiti S. P.;Perani D.
2022

Abstract

Background and Objectives Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities suggestive of vasogenic edema or sulcal effusion (ARIA-E) are the most common adverse events complicating Alzheimer disease (AD) immunotherapy with anti-beta-amyloid (A beta) monoclonal antibodies. ARIA-E can also occur spontaneously in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri), a rare autoimmune encephalopathy associated with increased CSF levels of anti-A beta autoantibodies. Although the pathophysiologic mechanisms of ARIA-E remain to be fully elucidated, experimental evidence from ex vivo studies suggests that gantenerumab and aducanumab enable microglial activation. However, the in vivo evidence for a direct association between neuroinflammation and ARIA-E in patients with high CSF anti-A beta (auto)antibody levels has never been demonstrated. Methods The spatial distribution and temporal variations of microglial activation associated with levels of anti-A beta autoantibodies at (sub)acute presentation of ARIA-E and after corticosteroid therapy were evaluated in a longitudinal case series of patients with CAA-ri, the spontaneous variant of the iatrogenic ARIA-E reported in A beta-lowering immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies. Multimodal and multiparametric MRI was used for CAA and ARIA-E severity quantification, according to validated scoring system; CSF testing for anti-A beta autoantibodies and AD biomarkers; C-11-PK11195 PET for activated microglia. Results At (sub)acute presentation, we found focal peaks of microglial activation having a greater spatial colocalization with ARIA-E compared with chronic age-related white matter change imaging abnormalities. The severity of ARIA-E and the magnitude of the associated microglial activation were greater in patients having AD and severe CAA concomitant disease compared with patients having CAA only. CSF anti-A beta autoantibodies at presentation were high in all patients and markedly decreased at posttreatment follow-up, in parallel with clinical resolution of acute symptoms, reduced ARIA-E severity, and reduced microglial activation. Discussion Our findings extend the current notion of ARIA-E by providing the first in vivo C-11-PK11195 PET evidence for an association between microglial activation and the magnitude and severity of ARIA-E in patients with increased CSF concentration of anti-A beta autoantibodies and comorbid AD and CAA disease. Our results highlight CSF testing for anti-A beta autoantibodies as a promising diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy response biomarker to help guide future treatment and management decisions in real clinical practice and clinical trials.
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Amyloid beta-Peptides
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Autoantibodies
Biomarkers
Humans
Immunologic Factors
Inflammation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Microglia
Alzheimer Disease
Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132859
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