Radiotherapy is a useful adjuvant treatment for patients with Cushing's disease that is not cured by surgery. In particular, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used worldwide as the preferred radiation technique in patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease. The most widely accepted criterion for hormonal remission after GKRS is normalization of urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels. When a clear biological target is not identified, irradiation of the whole pituitary gland can be considered. The 5-year probability of remission is 65%-75%. Normalization of hypercortisolism usually occurs within 3 years from GKRS treatment and control of tumor growth is optimal, approaching more than 90%. No clear predictor of a favorable outcome has emerged up to now, except for the experience of the treating team. In the largest series, development of partial or complete hypopituitarism occurred between 15% and 36%. Severe side effects of GKRS, such as optic neuropathy and oculomotor palsy, are uncommon but have been documented in patients previously exposed to radiation. Recurrence of disease has been reported in as high as 16%-18% of the patients who achieved normalization of UFC levels in the two largest series, whereas smaller series did not describe late failure of GKRS. The reason for this discrepancy is unclear, as is the relationship between hormonal and tumoral recurrence. Another unresolved issue is whether treatment with adrenal blocking drugs can jeopardize the results of GKRS. GKRS is an effective second-line treatment in patients with Cushing's disease not cured by surgery. Hypopituitarism is the most frequent side effect of GKRS, whereas severe neurologic complications are uncommon in radiation-naïve patients.

Role of radiosurgery in the treatment of Cushing's disease

Losa, Marco;Albano, Luigi;Bailo, Michele;Mortini, Pietro
2022-01-01

Abstract

Radiotherapy is a useful adjuvant treatment for patients with Cushing's disease that is not cured by surgery. In particular, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used worldwide as the preferred radiation technique in patients with persistent or recurrent Cushing's disease. The most widely accepted criterion for hormonal remission after GKRS is normalization of urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels. When a clear biological target is not identified, irradiation of the whole pituitary gland can be considered. The 5-year probability of remission is 65%-75%. Normalization of hypercortisolism usually occurs within 3 years from GKRS treatment and control of tumor growth is optimal, approaching more than 90%. No clear predictor of a favorable outcome has emerged up to now, except for the experience of the treating team. In the largest series, development of partial or complete hypopituitarism occurred between 15% and 36%. Severe side effects of GKRS, such as optic neuropathy and oculomotor palsy, are uncommon but have been documented in patients previously exposed to radiation. Recurrence of disease has been reported in as high as 16%-18% of the patients who achieved normalization of UFC levels in the two largest series, whereas smaller series did not describe late failure of GKRS. The reason for this discrepancy is unclear, as is the relationship between hormonal and tumoral recurrence. Another unresolved issue is whether treatment with adrenal blocking drugs can jeopardize the results of GKRS. GKRS is an effective second-line treatment in patients with Cushing's disease not cured by surgery. Hypopituitarism is the most frequent side effect of GKRS, whereas severe neurologic complications are uncommon in radiation-naïve patients.
adrenocorticotropin
hypercortisolism
hypopituitarism
radiotherapy
Humans
Pituitary Gland
Hypopituitarism
Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion
Pituitary Neoplasms
Radiosurgery
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132901
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