Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic progressive disease involving the female genital apparatus and lower urinary tract. This condition is related to hypoestrogenism consequent to menopause onset but is also due to the hormonal decrease after adjuvant therapy for patients affected by breast cancer. Considering the high prevalence of VVA and the expected growth of this condition due to the increase in the average age of the female population, it is easy to understand its significant social impact. VVA causes uncomfortable disorders, such as vaginal dryness, itching, burning, and dyspareunia, and requires constant treatment, on cessation of which symptoms tend to reappear. The currently available therapies include vaginal lubricants and moisturizers, vaginal estrogens and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), systemic hormone therapy, and Ospemifene. Considering, however, that such therapies have some problems that include contraindications, ineffectiveness, and low compliance, finding an innovative, effective, and safe treatment is crucial. The present data suggest great efficacy and safety of a vaginal laser in the treatment of genital symptoms and improvement in sexual function in patients affected by VVA. The beneficial effect tends to be sustained over the long-term, and no serious adverse events have been identified. The aim of this review is to report up-to-date efficacy and safety data of laser energy devices, in particular the microablative fractional carbon dioxide laser and the non-ablative photothermal Erbium-YAG laser.

New Innovations for the Treatment of Vulvovaginal Atrophy: An Up-to-Date Review

Benini, Vittoria
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Ruffolo, Alessandro Ferdinando
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Casiraghi, Arianna
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Degliuomini, Rebecca S
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Candiani, Massimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Salvatore, Stefano
Supervision
2022

Abstract

Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic progressive disease involving the female genital apparatus and lower urinary tract. This condition is related to hypoestrogenism consequent to menopause onset but is also due to the hormonal decrease after adjuvant therapy for patients affected by breast cancer. Considering the high prevalence of VVA and the expected growth of this condition due to the increase in the average age of the female population, it is easy to understand its significant social impact. VVA causes uncomfortable disorders, such as vaginal dryness, itching, burning, and dyspareunia, and requires constant treatment, on cessation of which symptoms tend to reappear. The currently available therapies include vaginal lubricants and moisturizers, vaginal estrogens and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), systemic hormone therapy, and Ospemifene. Considering, however, that such therapies have some problems that include contraindications, ineffectiveness, and low compliance, finding an innovative, effective, and safe treatment is crucial. The present data suggest great efficacy and safety of a vaginal laser in the treatment of genital symptoms and improvement in sexual function in patients affected by VVA. The beneficial effect tends to be sustained over the long-term, and no serious adverse events have been identified. The aim of this review is to report up-to-date efficacy and safety data of laser energy devices, in particular the microablative fractional carbon dioxide laser and the non-ablative photothermal Erbium-YAG laser.
CO2 laser
CO2 vaginal laser
Erbium YAG laser
er:YAG laser
genitourinary syndrome menopause
vaginal atrophy
vaginal laser
vulvovaginal atrophy
Atrophy
Female
Humans
Menopause
Treatment Outcome
Vagina
Lasers, Gas
Vaginal Diseases
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132984
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