Childbirth is a great change in woman life because of hormonal, physical and psychological alterations that are associated with this process. Dyspareunia and perineal pain are commonly reported symptoms in the postpartum period, mainly due to perineal trauma, lacerations, episiotomy, and forceps or vacuum use at delivery. Among non-pharmacological treatment, a new trend is gaining popularity, which is the energy-based therapy, including fractional micro-ablative CO2 laser. We conducted a multicentric retrospective study to assess the efficacy and the possible side effects of CO2 laser treatment on transient vulvovaginal atrophy and perineal postpartum pain related to puerperium and breastfeeding period. All patients were submitted to 3 or 4 sessions of CO2 laser treatment. As per protocol, an initial, intermediate (after 2 sessions) and final (3 months after the last cycle) evaluation of the symptoms were made, using a VAS (Visual Analogue Scale 0-10). We also compared this group of patients with a control group with no treatment. At the final evaluation, patients showed a significant improvement for dyspareunia (VAS from 7.95 to 3.14, p < 0.0001). A significant improvement was also registered in pain at the vaginal orifice (VAS from 6.94 to 2.05, p = 0.0001), dryness (VAS from 6.6 to 2.9, p = 0.0022), itching (VAS from 4.5 to 1.16, p = 0.0053), heat (VAS from 3 to 0, p = 0.0119) and burning (VAS from 5.5 to 1.6, p = 0.0013) if compared with the control group. Quality of life for the women during the breastfeeding and puerperium is important and training is mandatory to avoid side effects in order to improve the CO2 laser performance.

The beneficial effects of fractional CO2 laser treatment on perineal changes during puerperium and breastfeeding period: a multicentric study

Salvatore, Stefano;
2021

Abstract

Childbirth is a great change in woman life because of hormonal, physical and psychological alterations that are associated with this process. Dyspareunia and perineal pain are commonly reported symptoms in the postpartum period, mainly due to perineal trauma, lacerations, episiotomy, and forceps or vacuum use at delivery. Among non-pharmacological treatment, a new trend is gaining popularity, which is the energy-based therapy, including fractional micro-ablative CO2 laser. We conducted a multicentric retrospective study to assess the efficacy and the possible side effects of CO2 laser treatment on transient vulvovaginal atrophy and perineal postpartum pain related to puerperium and breastfeeding period. All patients were submitted to 3 or 4 sessions of CO2 laser treatment. As per protocol, an initial, intermediate (after 2 sessions) and final (3 months after the last cycle) evaluation of the symptoms were made, using a VAS (Visual Analogue Scale 0-10). We also compared this group of patients with a control group with no treatment. At the final evaluation, patients showed a significant improvement for dyspareunia (VAS from 7.95 to 3.14, p < 0.0001). A significant improvement was also registered in pain at the vaginal orifice (VAS from 6.94 to 2.05, p = 0.0001), dryness (VAS from 6.6 to 2.9, p = 0.0022), itching (VAS from 4.5 to 1.16, p = 0.0053), heat (VAS from 3 to 0, p = 0.0119) and burning (VAS from 5.5 to 1.6, p = 0.0013) if compared with the control group. Quality of life for the women during the breastfeeding and puerperium is important and training is mandatory to avoid side effects in order to improve the CO2 laser performance.
Co2 laser
Dyspareunia
Lactation
Puerperium
Vaginal atrophy
Atrophy
Breast Feeding
Carbon Dioxide
Female
Humans
Postpartum Period
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Dyspareunia
Lasers, Gas
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/133035
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