Objectives: Type 2 diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, but little is known about whether it influences participation in colorectal cancer screening programmes. This study tested the extent to which Type 2 diabetes is negatively associated with colorectal cancer screening uptake. Methods: We analysed individual data of screening eligible men and women aged 60–75 without cancer diagnosis from wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (collected 2012–2013), to investigate whether Type 2 Diabetes influences colorectal cancer screening behaviour independently of demographic characteristics, body mass index, socio-economic status and other chronic diseases. Results: Individuals who reported to have Type 2 diabetes or had glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 48 mmol/mol or higher were less likely to have ever completed a screening test (faecal occult blood test; 62.8% vs. 75.8%, p < 0.01) or to be up-to-date with their biennial screening invitation (60.2% vs. 72.0%, p < 0.05). The negative associations of Type 2 diabetes on colorectal cancer screening were found both in unadjusted and adjusted regression models. Conclusions: Future qualitative and quantitative research should identify reasons for this discrepancy, to inform interventions to increase screening uptake in this high-risk population.

Type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer screening: Findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Renzi C.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: Type 2 diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for colorectal cancer, but little is known about whether it influences participation in colorectal cancer screening programmes. This study tested the extent to which Type 2 diabetes is negatively associated with colorectal cancer screening uptake. Methods: We analysed individual data of screening eligible men and women aged 60–75 without cancer diagnosis from wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (collected 2012–2013), to investigate whether Type 2 Diabetes influences colorectal cancer screening behaviour independently of demographic characteristics, body mass index, socio-economic status and other chronic diseases. Results: Individuals who reported to have Type 2 diabetes or had glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 48 mmol/mol or higher were less likely to have ever completed a screening test (faecal occult blood test; 62.8% vs. 75.8%, p < 0.01) or to be up-to-date with their biennial screening invitation (60.2% vs. 72.0%, p < 0.05). The negative associations of Type 2 diabetes on colorectal cancer screening were found both in unadjusted and adjusted regression models. Conclusions: Future qualitative and quantitative research should identify reasons for this discrepancy, to inform interventions to increase screening uptake in this high-risk population.
Bowel cancer
bowel cancer screening
colorectal cancer screening
comorbidities
diabetes
screening participation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/134024
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