Background: Melanoma has a complex molecular background and multiple genes are involved in its development and progression. The advent of next generation sequencing platforms has enabled the evaluation of multiple genes at a time, thus unraveling new insights into the genetics of melanoma. We investigated a set of germline mutations able to discriminate the development of multiple primary melanomas (MPM) vs. single site primary melanomas (SPM) using a targeted next generation sequencing panel. Materials and Methods: A total of 39 patients, 20 with SPM and 19 with MPM, were enrolled in our study. Next generation analysis was carried out using a custom targeted sequencing panel that included 32 genes known to have a role in several carcinogenic pathways, such as those involved in DNA repair, pigmentation, regulation of kinases, cell cycle control and senescence. Results: We found a significant correlation between PIK3CA:p.I391M and MPMs, compared to SPMs, p = 0.031 and a trend for the association between CYP1B1: p.N453S and SPMs, compared to MPMs (p = 0.096). We also found that both subgroups shared a spectrum of 9 alterations in 8 genes (CYP1B1: p.N453S, BAP1: p.C39fs, PIK3CA: p.I391M, CDKAL1: c.1226_1227TG, POLE: p.V1161fs, OCA2: p.R419Q, OCA2: p.R305W, MC1R: p.V60L, MGMT: p.L115F), which suggested that these genes may play a role in melanoma development. Conclusions: In conclusion, despite the small cohort of patients, we found that germline mutations, such as those of PIK3CAand CYP1B1, might contribute to the differential development of SPM and MPM.

The Genetic Germline Background of Single and Multiple Primary Melanomas

Guida S.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background: Melanoma has a complex molecular background and multiple genes are involved in its development and progression. The advent of next generation sequencing platforms has enabled the evaluation of multiple genes at a time, thus unraveling new insights into the genetics of melanoma. We investigated a set of germline mutations able to discriminate the development of multiple primary melanomas (MPM) vs. single site primary melanomas (SPM) using a targeted next generation sequencing panel. Materials and Methods: A total of 39 patients, 20 with SPM and 19 with MPM, were enrolled in our study. Next generation analysis was carried out using a custom targeted sequencing panel that included 32 genes known to have a role in several carcinogenic pathways, such as those involved in DNA repair, pigmentation, regulation of kinases, cell cycle control and senescence. Results: We found a significant correlation between PIK3CA:p.I391M and MPMs, compared to SPMs, p = 0.031 and a trend for the association between CYP1B1: p.N453S and SPMs, compared to MPMs (p = 0.096). We also found that both subgroups shared a spectrum of 9 alterations in 8 genes (CYP1B1: p.N453S, BAP1: p.C39fs, PIK3CA: p.I391M, CDKAL1: c.1226_1227TG, POLE: p.V1161fs, OCA2: p.R419Q, OCA2: p.R305W, MC1R: p.V60L, MGMT: p.L115F), which suggested that these genes may play a role in melanoma development. Conclusions: In conclusion, despite the small cohort of patients, we found that germline mutations, such as those of PIK3CAand CYP1B1, might contribute to the differential development of SPM and MPM.
genetics
germline mutations
multiple primary melanomas
single primary melanoma
targeted next generation sequencing
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/134311
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