Objectives: Psychosocial care is essential in oncology to address specific cancer-related fatigue dimensions. Psychosocial interventions have been defined as nonpharmacologic interventions that address psychological or social factors rather than biological mechanisms and might positively influence symptoms, quality of life, and social functioning. This systematic review of systematic reviews pooled the effects from the recent systematic reviews describing the relationships between psychosocial interventions and fatigue in adult patients with cancer, providing an overall estimate of their effect on cancer-related fatigue. Data Sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PEDro, and PsycINFO were searched from 2010 through 2022. The study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The risk of bias in eligible systematic reviews was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool (ROBIS). Protocol registration: Prospero (CRD42020194254). Conclusion: Psychosocial interventions are a promising option to reduce cancer-related fatigue, albeit with short-term effects. However, further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of specific interventions within population clusters and to examine their long-term effectiveness. Implications for Nursing Practice: Nurses play a crucial role in promoting psychosocial dimensions in cancer care. This study provides clinicians and researchers with up-to-date information on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for reducing cancer-related fatigue overcoming the limits of several separate systematic reviews. The results might guide future research and facilitate the translation of the evidence into clinical practice, acknowledging that a gap between the unmet needs of patients with cancer and appropriate health care services still needs addressing.

A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews and Pooled Meta-Analysis on Psychosocial Interventions for Improving Cancer-Related Fatigue

Villa G.
Penultimo
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: Psychosocial care is essential in oncology to address specific cancer-related fatigue dimensions. Psychosocial interventions have been defined as nonpharmacologic interventions that address psychological or social factors rather than biological mechanisms and might positively influence symptoms, quality of life, and social functioning. This systematic review of systematic reviews pooled the effects from the recent systematic reviews describing the relationships between psychosocial interventions and fatigue in adult patients with cancer, providing an overall estimate of their effect on cancer-related fatigue. Data Sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PEDro, and PsycINFO were searched from 2010 through 2022. The study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The risk of bias in eligible systematic reviews was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool (ROBIS). Protocol registration: Prospero (CRD42020194254). Conclusion: Psychosocial interventions are a promising option to reduce cancer-related fatigue, albeit with short-term effects. However, further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of specific interventions within population clusters and to examine their long-term effectiveness. Implications for Nursing Practice: Nurses play a crucial role in promoting psychosocial dimensions in cancer care. This study provides clinicians and researchers with up-to-date information on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for reducing cancer-related fatigue overcoming the limits of several separate systematic reviews. The results might guide future research and facilitate the translation of the evidence into clinical practice, acknowledging that a gap between the unmet needs of patients with cancer and appropriate health care services still needs addressing.
2022
Cancer
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Fatigue
Psychosocial intervention
Systematic review
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/135777
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