Objective The role of age in influencing the severity of fibromyalgia (FM) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to define the contribution of age in the severity of FM from data from a large national database. Methods This cross-sectional study included adult patients with FM diagnosed according to the 2010/2011 American College of Rheumatology criteria. Disease severity was assessed with the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status (FAS 2019mod). Patients were grouped into five age categories (between 18-40 years, between 41-50 years, between 51-60 years, between 61-70 years, and ≥71 years). Differences in disease severity between groups were assessed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results The study included 2889 patients (199 males and 2690 females), mean age of 52.58 (±11.82) years, with a mean FIQR score of 59.22 (±22.98) and a mean FAS 2019mod of 25.50 (±8.66). Comparing the mean values of the various indices between age categories, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups for FIQR total score and FAS 2019mod. However, the 60–70 years category showed the lowest scores for both scales. The main difference emerged for the FIQR physical function subscale, where the ≥71 years category showed significantly higher scores (p<0.05) compared the 18–40 years category. Conclusion The severity of FM has a significant level of stationarity according to age categories. Patients between 60–70 years have a lower disease burden. Physical function is the health domain with the most significant difference between the groups.

Fibromyalgia severity according to age categories: results of a cross-sectional study from a large national database

Dagna L.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Objective The role of age in influencing the severity of fibromyalgia (FM) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to define the contribution of age in the severity of FM from data from a large national database. Methods This cross-sectional study included adult patients with FM diagnosed according to the 2010/2011 American College of Rheumatology criteria. Disease severity was assessed with the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status (FAS 2019mod). Patients were grouped into five age categories (between 18-40 years, between 41-50 years, between 51-60 years, between 61-70 years, and ≥71 years). Differences in disease severity between groups were assessed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results The study included 2889 patients (199 males and 2690 females), mean age of 52.58 (±11.82) years, with a mean FIQR score of 59.22 (±22.98) and a mean FAS 2019mod of 25.50 (±8.66). Comparing the mean values of the various indices between age categories, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups for FIQR total score and FAS 2019mod. However, the 60–70 years category showed the lowest scores for both scales. The main difference emerged for the FIQR physical function subscale, where the ≥71 years category showed significantly higher scores (p<0.05) compared the 18–40 years category. Conclusion The severity of FM has a significant level of stationarity according to age categories. Patients between 60–70 years have a lower disease burden. Physical function is the health domain with the most significant difference between the groups.
age
disease severity
FAS 2019mod
fibromyalgia
FIQR
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/135797
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