Background and aim: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. Since GTD and its malignant sequel gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) are rare diseases, little evidence is available from randomised controlled trials on optimal treatment and follow-up. Treatment protocols vary within Europe, and even between different centres within countries. One of the goals of the 'European Organisation for Treatment of Trophoblastic Diseases' (EOTTD) is to harmonise treatment in Europe. To provide a basis for European standardisation of definitions, treatment and follow-up protocols in GTD, we composed a set of guidelines for minimal requirements and optimal management of GTD.Methods: Members from each EOTTD country attended multiple workshops during annual EOTTD meetings. Clinical guidelines were formulated by consensus and evidence where available. The following guidelines were discussed: diagnostics of GTD and GTN, treatment of low-risk GTN, high-risk GTN, ultra-high-risk GTN, placental site and epithelioid trophoblastic tumours and follow-up.Results: Between 40 and 65 EOTTD members from 17 European countries and 7 non-European countries attended the clinical workshops held on 6 occasions. Flow diagrams for patient management were composed to display minimum and best practice for most treatment situations. New agreed definitions of recurrence and chemotherapy resistance were formulated.Conclusions: Despite the many differences between and within the participating countries, an important step in uniform treatment of GTD and GTN within Europe was made by the Clinical Working Party of the EOTTD. This is an example on how guidelines and harmonisation can be achieved within international networks. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Practical clinical guidelines of the EOTTD for treatment and referral of gestational trophoblastic disease

Bergamini, Alice
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background and aim: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. Since GTD and its malignant sequel gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) are rare diseases, little evidence is available from randomised controlled trials on optimal treatment and follow-up. Treatment protocols vary within Europe, and even between different centres within countries. One of the goals of the 'European Organisation for Treatment of Trophoblastic Diseases' (EOTTD) is to harmonise treatment in Europe. To provide a basis for European standardisation of definitions, treatment and follow-up protocols in GTD, we composed a set of guidelines for minimal requirements and optimal management of GTD.Methods: Members from each EOTTD country attended multiple workshops during annual EOTTD meetings. Clinical guidelines were formulated by consensus and evidence where available. The following guidelines were discussed: diagnostics of GTD and GTN, treatment of low-risk GTN, high-risk GTN, ultra-high-risk GTN, placental site and epithelioid trophoblastic tumours and follow-up.Results: Between 40 and 65 EOTTD members from 17 European countries and 7 non-European countries attended the clinical workshops held on 6 occasions. Flow diagrams for patient management were composed to display minimum and best practice for most treatment situations. New agreed definitions of recurrence and chemotherapy resistance were formulated.Conclusions: Despite the many differences between and within the participating countries, an important step in uniform treatment of GTD and GTN within Europe was made by the Clinical Working Party of the EOTTD. This is an example on how guidelines and harmonisation can be achieved within international networks. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Consensus
Europe
Gestational trophoblastic disease
Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia
Referral and consultation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/135832
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