Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood, while multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by remission and exacerbation phases. An association between MS and rheumatologic diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis, has been described and numerous studies acknowledge anti-TNF-α drugs as MS triggers. Conversely, the association between MS and JIA has been reported merely in five cases in the literature. We describe two cases of adult patients with longstanding JIA and JIA-associated uveitis, who developed MS. The first patient was on methotrexate and adalimumab when she developed dizziness and nausea. Characteristic MRI lesions and oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid led to MS diagnosis. Adalimumab was discontinued, and she was treated with three pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone. After a few months, rituximab was started. The second patient had been treated with anti-TNF-α and then switched to abatacept. She complained of unilateral arm and facial paraesthesias; brain MRI showed characteristic lesions, and MS was diagnosed. Three pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone were administered; neurological disease remained stable, and abatacept was reintroduced. Further studies are warranted to define if there is an association between JIA and MS, if MS represents JIA comorbidity or if anti-TNF-α underpins MS development.

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Uveitis and Multiple Sclerosis: Description of Two Patients and Literature Review

Miserocchi E.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood, while multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by remission and exacerbation phases. An association between MS and rheumatologic diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis, has been described and numerous studies acknowledge anti-TNF-α drugs as MS triggers. Conversely, the association between MS and JIA has been reported merely in five cases in the literature. We describe two cases of adult patients with longstanding JIA and JIA-associated uveitis, who developed MS. The first patient was on methotrexate and adalimumab when she developed dizziness and nausea. Characteristic MRI lesions and oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid led to MS diagnosis. Adalimumab was discontinued, and she was treated with three pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone. After a few months, rituximab was started. The second patient had been treated with anti-TNF-α and then switched to abatacept. She complained of unilateral arm and facial paraesthesias; brain MRI showed characteristic lesions, and MS was diagnosed. Three pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone were administered; neurological disease remained stable, and abatacept was reintroduced. Further studies are warranted to define if there is an association between JIA and MS, if MS represents JIA comorbidity or if anti-TNF-α underpins MS development.
anti-TNF-α agents
comorbidity
juvenile idiopathic arthritis
multiple sclerosis
treatment
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/136219
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