Objectives: To assess safety and outcomes of the novel 2-stage hepatectomy, Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy (ALPPS), using an international registry. Background: ALPPS induces accelerated growth of small future liver remnants (FLR) to allow curative resection of liver tumors. There is concern about safety based on reports of higher morbidity and mortality. Methods: A Web-based data entry system was created with password access and data pseudoencryption (NCT01924741). All patients with complete 90-day data were included. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for severe complications and mortality and volume growth of the FLR. Results: Complete data were available for 202 patients. A total of 141 (70%) patients had colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Median starting standardized future liver remnants of 21% increased by 80% within a median of 7 days. Ninety-day mortality was 19/202 (9%). Severe complications including mortalities (Clavien-Dindo ≥IIIb) occurred in 27% of patients. Independent factors for severe complications were red blood cell transfusion [odds ratio (OR), 5.2), ALPPS stage I operating time greater than 300 minutes (OR, 4.4), age more than 60 years (OR, 3.8), and non-CRLM (OR, 2.7). Age, use of Pringle maneuver, and histologic changes led to less volume growth. In patients younger than 60 years with CRLM, 90-day mortality was similar to conventional 2-stage hepatectomies for CRLM. Conclusions: This is the first analysis of the ALPPS registry showing that ALPPS has increased perioperative morbidity and mortality in older patients but better outcomes in patients with CRLM.

Early survival and safety of ALPPS: first report of the International ALPPS Registry

Ratti F
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2014-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: To assess safety and outcomes of the novel 2-stage hepatectomy, Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy (ALPPS), using an international registry. Background: ALPPS induces accelerated growth of small future liver remnants (FLR) to allow curative resection of liver tumors. There is concern about safety based on reports of higher morbidity and mortality. Methods: A Web-based data entry system was created with password access and data pseudoencryption (NCT01924741). All patients with complete 90-day data were included. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for severe complications and mortality and volume growth of the FLR. Results: Complete data were available for 202 patients. A total of 141 (70%) patients had colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Median starting standardized future liver remnants of 21% increased by 80% within a median of 7 days. Ninety-day mortality was 19/202 (9%). Severe complications including mortalities (Clavien-Dindo ≥IIIb) occurred in 27% of patients. Independent factors for severe complications were red blood cell transfusion [odds ratio (OR), 5.2), ALPPS stage I operating time greater than 300 minutes (OR, 4.4), age more than 60 years (OR, 3.8), and non-CRLM (OR, 2.7). Age, use of Pringle maneuver, and histologic changes led to less volume growth. In patients younger than 60 years with CRLM, 90-day mortality was similar to conventional 2-stage hepatectomies for CRLM. Conclusions: This is the first analysis of the ALPPS registry showing that ALPPS has increased perioperative morbidity and mortality in older patients but better outcomes in patients with CRLM.
2014
ALPPS, hepatectomy, hypertrophy, liver tumors, portal vein
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/140322
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