OBJECTIVES: This study sought to report long-term clinical outcomes in patients treated with the provisional T-stenting and small protrusion (TAP) technique.BACKGROUND: Several strategies have been proposed for treating bifurcation lesions, each with its own merits and technical challenges. The TAP technique is a relatively new strategy that is technically less challenging, ensures complete coverage of the side-branch ostium, and minimizes stent overlap. Although there is reasonable amount of data for other bifurcation strategies, the long-term clinical outcomes for TAP technique are limited.METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients who underwent TAP technique with drug-eluting stents between July 2005 and January 2012. The measured endpoints at follow-up were major adverse cardiac events defined as composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization.RESULTS: A total of 95 patients (81.1% men) with a mean age of 64.8 years underwent TAP stenting. Procedural success was achieved in 100% of cases. True bifurcation was observed in 75 (78.9%) patients. First-generation drug-eluting stents were used in 55.8% of patients. The outcome rates at 3-year follow-up of major adverse cardiac events, cardiac death/follow-up myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization were 12.9%, 3.1%, 9.7%, and 5.1%, respectively. There were no cases of follow-up myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis (definite and probable).CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that TAP technique is associated with acceptable clinical outcomes with no episodes of definite and probable stent thrombosis. Further studies should compare TAP technique with other 2-stent strategies.

The long-term clinical outcome of T-stenting and small protrusion technique for coronary bifurcation lesions / Naganuma, Toru; Latib, Azeem; Basavarajaiah, Sandeep; Chieffo, Alaide; Figini, Filippo; Carlino, Mauro; Montorfano, M; Godino, Cosmo; Ferrarello, Santo; Hasegawa, Tasuku; Kawaguchi, Masanori; Nakamura, Sunao; Colombo, Antonio. - In: JACC. CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS. - ISSN 1876-7605. - (2013). [10.1016/j.jcin.2013.01.137]

The long-term clinical outcome of T-stenting and small protrusion technique for coronary bifurcation lesions

Chieffo Alaide;Montorfano M;
2013-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to report long-term clinical outcomes in patients treated with the provisional T-stenting and small protrusion (TAP) technique.BACKGROUND: Several strategies have been proposed for treating bifurcation lesions, each with its own merits and technical challenges. The TAP technique is a relatively new strategy that is technically less challenging, ensures complete coverage of the side-branch ostium, and minimizes stent overlap. Although there is reasonable amount of data for other bifurcation strategies, the long-term clinical outcomes for TAP technique are limited.METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients who underwent TAP technique with drug-eluting stents between July 2005 and January 2012. The measured endpoints at follow-up were major adverse cardiac events defined as composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization.RESULTS: A total of 95 patients (81.1% men) with a mean age of 64.8 years underwent TAP stenting. Procedural success was achieved in 100% of cases. True bifurcation was observed in 75 (78.9%) patients. First-generation drug-eluting stents were used in 55.8% of patients. The outcome rates at 3-year follow-up of major adverse cardiac events, cardiac death/follow-up myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization were 12.9%, 3.1%, 9.7%, and 5.1%, respectively. There were no cases of follow-up myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis (definite and probable).CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that TAP technique is associated with acceptable clinical outcomes with no episodes of definite and probable stent thrombosis. Further studies should compare TAP technique with other 2-stent strategies.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/144956
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 20
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 18
social impact