Migraine is one of the most common neurological diseases and it has a huge social and personal impact. Although head pain is the core symptom, individuals with migraine can have a plethora of non-headache symptoms that precede, accompany, or follow the pain. Neuroimaging studies have shown that the involvement of specific brain areas can explain many of the symptoms reported during the different phases of migraine. Recruitment of the hypothalamus, pons, spinal trigeminal nucleus, thalamus, and visual and pain-processing cortical areas starts during the premonitory phase and persists through the headache phase, contributing to the onset of pain and associated symptoms. Once the pain stops, the involvement of most brain areas ends, although the pons, hypothalamus, and visual cortex remain active after acute treatment intake and resolution of migraine symptoms. A better understanding of the correlations between imaging findings and migraine symptomatology can provide new insight into migraine pathophysiology and the mechanisms of novel migraine-specific treatments.

Insights into migraine attacks from neuroimaging / Messina, Roberta; Rocca, Maria A; Goadsby, Peter J; Filippi, Massimo. - In: LANCET NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 1474-4422. - 22:(2023), pp. 834-846. [10.1016/S1474-4422(23)00152-7]

Insights into migraine attacks from neuroimaging

Messina, Roberta
Primo
;
Rocca, Maria A
Secondo
;
Filippi, Massimo
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Migraine is one of the most common neurological diseases and it has a huge social and personal impact. Although head pain is the core symptom, individuals with migraine can have a plethora of non-headache symptoms that precede, accompany, or follow the pain. Neuroimaging studies have shown that the involvement of specific brain areas can explain many of the symptoms reported during the different phases of migraine. Recruitment of the hypothalamus, pons, spinal trigeminal nucleus, thalamus, and visual and pain-processing cortical areas starts during the premonitory phase and persists through the headache phase, contributing to the onset of pain and associated symptoms. Once the pain stops, the involvement of most brain areas ends, although the pons, hypothalamus, and visual cortex remain active after acute treatment intake and resolution of migraine symptoms. A better understanding of the correlations between imaging findings and migraine symptomatology can provide new insight into migraine pathophysiology and the mechanisms of novel migraine-specific treatments.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/147737
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