The peribiliary glands are intramural or extramural structures with multiple functions related to bile secretion. The peribiliary glands can develop cystic alterations in several conditions, such as alcohol addiction. Peribiliary cysts can enlarge till being radiologically visible and mimic cancer. We studied 217 consecutive explanted livers for end-stage alcohol-related liver disease from the Pathology Unit of the Liver Unit at the King's College Hospital in Denmark Hill, with particular focus on peribiliary glands. Our cohort consisted of 31 females and 186 males, with a median age of 51 and of 56 years respectively. 92,2% had established cirrhosis, 73,3% had only alcohol-induced liver disease, whilst 26,7% had other co-morbidities. We found a mild ectasia of the peribiliary glands (<2 mm) in 37,8% and peribiliary cysts (> = 2 mm) in 22,6% of cases. The diameter of the peribiliary glands varied from 1 mm to 8 mm. Inflammation of the peribiliary glands was found in the majority of cases with dilatation (p value = 0,000). 4,6% of the peribiliary cysts had low-grade intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile ducts confined to the peribiliary glands. Pancreatic heterotopia was found in 10,6% and associated with the presence of ectasia. Our findings fit with what is reported in literature, such as the alcohol-induced damage at the peribiliary glands. Moreover these results underline the possible role of peribiliary glands in the development of the intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile ducts, the biliary counterpart of the branch type intraductal mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

Peribiliary glands pathology in a large series of end-stage alcohol-related liver disease / Pedica, F; Heaton, N; Quaglia, A.. - In: VIRCHOWS ARCHIV. - ISSN 0945-6317. - 477:6(2020), pp. 817-823. [10.1007/s00428-020-02851-3]

Peribiliary glands pathology in a large series of end-stage alcohol-related liver disease

Pedica F
Primo
;
Quaglia A.
Ultimo
2020-01-01

Abstract

The peribiliary glands are intramural or extramural structures with multiple functions related to bile secretion. The peribiliary glands can develop cystic alterations in several conditions, such as alcohol addiction. Peribiliary cysts can enlarge till being radiologically visible and mimic cancer. We studied 217 consecutive explanted livers for end-stage alcohol-related liver disease from the Pathology Unit of the Liver Unit at the King's College Hospital in Denmark Hill, with particular focus on peribiliary glands. Our cohort consisted of 31 females and 186 males, with a median age of 51 and of 56 years respectively. 92,2% had established cirrhosis, 73,3% had only alcohol-induced liver disease, whilst 26,7% had other co-morbidities. We found a mild ectasia of the peribiliary glands (<2 mm) in 37,8% and peribiliary cysts (> = 2 mm) in 22,6% of cases. The diameter of the peribiliary glands varied from 1 mm to 8 mm. Inflammation of the peribiliary glands was found in the majority of cases with dilatation (p value = 0,000). 4,6% of the peribiliary cysts had low-grade intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile ducts confined to the peribiliary glands. Pancreatic heterotopia was found in 10,6% and associated with the presence of ectasia. Our findings fit with what is reported in literature, such as the alcohol-induced damage at the peribiliary glands. Moreover these results underline the possible role of peribiliary glands in the development of the intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile ducts, the biliary counterpart of the branch type intraductal mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.
2020
Alcohol-induced liver disease; Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct; Peribiliary cysts; Peribiliary glands
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/149605
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