Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) residing in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of white adipose tissue are recently emerging as an alternative tool for stem cell-based therapy in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a complex connective tissue disorder affecting the skin and internal organs with fibrotic and vascular lesions. Several preclinical and clinical studies have reported promising therapeutic effects of fat grafting and autologous SVF/ADSC-based local treatment for facial and hand cutaneous manifestations of SSc patients. However, currently available data indicate that ADSCs may represent a double-edged sword in SSc, as they may exhibit a pro-fibrotic and anti-adipogenic phenotype, possibly behaving as an additional pathogenic source of pro-fibrotic myofibroblasts through the adipocyte-to-myofibroblast transition process. Thus, in the perspective of a larger employ of SSc-ADSCs for further therapeutic applications, it is important to definitely unravel whether these cells present a comparable phenotype and similar immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic properties in respect to healthy ADSCs. In light of the dual role that ADSCs seem to play in SSc, this review will provide a summary of the most recent insights into the preclinical and clinical studies employing SVF and ADSCs for the treatment of the disease and, at the same time, will focus on the main findings highlighting the possible involvement of these stem cells in SSc-related fibrosis pathogenesis.

Adipose-derived stem cells: Pathophysiologic implications vs therapeutic potential in systemic sclerosis / Rosa, Irene; Romano, Eloisa; Fioretto, Bianca Saveria; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Manetti, Mirko. - In: WORLD JOURNAL OF STEM CELLS. - ISSN 1948-0210. - 13:1(2021), pp. 30-48. [10.4252/wjsc.v13.i1.30]

Adipose-derived stem cells: Pathophysiologic implications vs therapeutic potential in systemic sclerosis

Matucci-Cerinic, Marco
Penultimo
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) residing in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of white adipose tissue are recently emerging as an alternative tool for stem cell-based therapy in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a complex connective tissue disorder affecting the skin and internal organs with fibrotic and vascular lesions. Several preclinical and clinical studies have reported promising therapeutic effects of fat grafting and autologous SVF/ADSC-based local treatment for facial and hand cutaneous manifestations of SSc patients. However, currently available data indicate that ADSCs may represent a double-edged sword in SSc, as they may exhibit a pro-fibrotic and anti-adipogenic phenotype, possibly behaving as an additional pathogenic source of pro-fibrotic myofibroblasts through the adipocyte-to-myofibroblast transition process. Thus, in the perspective of a larger employ of SSc-ADSCs for further therapeutic applications, it is important to definitely unravel whether these cells present a comparable phenotype and similar immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic properties in respect to healthy ADSCs. In light of the dual role that ADSCs seem to play in SSc, this review will provide a summary of the most recent insights into the preclinical and clinical studies employing SVF and ADSCs for the treatment of the disease and, at the same time, will focus on the main findings highlighting the possible involvement of these stem cells in SSc-related fibrosis pathogenesis.
2021
Systemic sclerosis
Adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction
Adipose-derived stem cells
Therapeutic approaches
Pathogenesis
Adipocyte-to-myofibroblast transition
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/154233
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