Amyloidosis comprises a group of diseases characterized by the extracellular deposition of insoluble fibrillar proteins. This mechanism generates different clinical syndromes depending on the site and extent of organ involvement. Amyloidosis is classified into categories of systemic and localized disease. Systemic amyloidosis is further subdivided into a hereditary familial form (for example, ATTR amyloidosis), a reactive form (AA amyloidosis), dialysis-related (AΒ 2 M) amyloidosis and immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis. Treatment can be symptomatic, directed at the affected organ, or can be directed at reducing the production of the abnormal proteins with different strategies. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis is still poor and depends on the underlying disease as well as the type and degree of dysfunction in involved organs. Early diagnosis is essential because patients with advanced disease are generally unable to undergo intensive therapy. Patients with systemic amyloidosis often present to a rheumatologist not only because the disease can include musculoskeletal and articular symptoms but also because it can be associated with chronic rheumatic diseases. This Review discusses the clinical features of amyloidosis and its rheumatic manifestations. The various types of amyloidosis, as well their prognosis and treatment, are also presented.

Systemic amyloidosis: a challenge for the rheumatologist / Perfetto, Federico; MOGGI PIGNONE, Alberto; Livi, Riccardo; Tempestini, Alessio; Bergesio, F; MATUCCI CERINIC, Marco. - In: NATURE REVIEWS. RHEUMATOLOGY. - ISSN 1759-4790. - 6:(2010), pp. 417-429. [10.1038/nrrheum.2010.84]

Systemic amyloidosis: a challenge for the rheumatologist

MATUCCI CERINIC, MARCO
2010-01-01

Abstract

Amyloidosis comprises a group of diseases characterized by the extracellular deposition of insoluble fibrillar proteins. This mechanism generates different clinical syndromes depending on the site and extent of organ involvement. Amyloidosis is classified into categories of systemic and localized disease. Systemic amyloidosis is further subdivided into a hereditary familial form (for example, ATTR amyloidosis), a reactive form (AA amyloidosis), dialysis-related (AΒ 2 M) amyloidosis and immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis. Treatment can be symptomatic, directed at the affected organ, or can be directed at reducing the production of the abnormal proteins with different strategies. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis is still poor and depends on the underlying disease as well as the type and degree of dysfunction in involved organs. Early diagnosis is essential because patients with advanced disease are generally unable to undergo intensive therapy. Patients with systemic amyloidosis often present to a rheumatologist not only because the disease can include musculoskeletal and articular symptoms but also because it can be associated with chronic rheumatic diseases. This Review discusses the clinical features of amyloidosis and its rheumatic manifestations. The various types of amyloidosis, as well their prognosis and treatment, are also presented.
2010
amyloidosis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/154531
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