Abstract IMPORTANCE: High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have shown efficacy in systemic sclerosis in phase 1 and small phase 2 trials. OBJECTIVE: To compare efficacy and safety of HSCT vs 12 successive monthly intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Scleroderma (ASTIS) trial, a phase 3, multicenter, randomized (1:1), open-label, parallel-group, clinical trial conducted in 10 countries at 29 centers with access to a European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation-registered transplant facility. From March 2001 to October 2009, 156 patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis were recruited and followed up until October 31, 2013. INTERVENTIONS: HSCT vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary end point was event-free survival, defined as time from randomization until the occurrence of death or persistent major organ failure. RESULTS: A total of 156 patients were randomly assigned to receive HSCT (n = 79) or cyclophosphamide (n = 77). During a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 53 events occurred: 22 in the HSCT group (19 deaths and 3 irreversible organ failures) and 31 in the control group (23 deaths and 8 irreversible organ failures). During the first year, there were more events in the HSCT group (13 events [16.5%], including 8 treatment-related deaths) than in the control group (8 events [10.4%], with no treatment-related deaths). At 2 years, 14 events (17.7%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 14 events (18.2%) in the control group; at 4 years, 15 events (19%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 20 events (26%) in the control group. Time-varying hazard ratios (modeled with treatment × time interaction) for event-free survival were 0.35 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 2 years and 0.34 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 4 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, HSCT was associated with increased treatment-related mortality in the first year after treatment. However, HCST conferred a significant long-term event-free survival benefit.

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: A randomized clinical trial / Van Laar, Jacob M; Farge, Dominique; Sont, Jacob K.; Naraghi, Kamran; Marjanovic, Zora; Larghero, Jérôme; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Schattenberg, Anton V.; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Van De Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Daikeler, Thomas; Kötter, Ina; Schmalzing, Marc; Martin, Thierry; Lioure, Bruno; Weiner, Stefan M.; Kreuter, Alexander; Deligny, Christophe; Durand, Jean-Marc; Emery, Paul; Machold, Klaus P.; Sarrot-Reynauld, Francoise; Warnatz, Klaus; Adoue, Daniel F. P.; Constans, Joël; Tony, Hans-Peter; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Fassas, Athanasios; Himsel, Andrea; Launay, David; Lo Monaco, Andrea; Philippe, Pierre; Queŕé, Isabelle; Rich, Eŕic; Westhovens, Rene; Griffiths, Bridget; Saccardi, Riccardo; Van Den Hoogen, Frank H.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Socié, Geŕard; Gratwohl, Alois; Tyndall, Alan; Bellando Randone, Silvia. - In: JAMA. - ISSN 0098-7484. - 311:(2014), pp. 2490-2498. [10.1001/jama.2014.6368]

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: A randomized clinical trial

Matucci-Cerinic, Marco;
2014-01-01

Abstract

Abstract IMPORTANCE: High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have shown efficacy in systemic sclerosis in phase 1 and small phase 2 trials. OBJECTIVE: To compare efficacy and safety of HSCT vs 12 successive monthly intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Scleroderma (ASTIS) trial, a phase 3, multicenter, randomized (1:1), open-label, parallel-group, clinical trial conducted in 10 countries at 29 centers with access to a European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation-registered transplant facility. From March 2001 to October 2009, 156 patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis were recruited and followed up until October 31, 2013. INTERVENTIONS: HSCT vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary end point was event-free survival, defined as time from randomization until the occurrence of death or persistent major organ failure. RESULTS: A total of 156 patients were randomly assigned to receive HSCT (n = 79) or cyclophosphamide (n = 77). During a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 53 events occurred: 22 in the HSCT group (19 deaths and 3 irreversible organ failures) and 31 in the control group (23 deaths and 8 irreversible organ failures). During the first year, there were more events in the HSCT group (13 events [16.5%], including 8 treatment-related deaths) than in the control group (8 events [10.4%], with no treatment-related deaths). At 2 years, 14 events (17.7%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 14 events (18.2%) in the control group; at 4 years, 15 events (19%) had occurred cumulatively in the HSCT group vs 20 events (26%) in the control group. Time-varying hazard ratios (modeled with treatment × time interaction) for event-free survival were 0.35 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 2 years and 0.34 (95% CI, 0.16-0.74) at 4 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, HSCT was associated with increased treatment-related mortality in the first year after treatment. However, HCST conferred a significant long-term event-free survival benefit.
2014
Adult
Autografts
Cyclophosphamide
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Scleroderma
Diffuse
Survival Analysis
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Medicine (all)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/154637
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