Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions characterized by widespread epidermal necrosis, mucous membrane erosions, and systemic findings. We have provided our 11-year experience from a Milan, Italy tertiary hospital managing SJS/TEN, evaluating the clinical and histopathologic features plus the impact on mortality. We retrospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with SJS/TEN based on the clinical and histopathologic findings, according to the classification criteria of multiple studies. We assessed the dermatographics, comorbidities, drug history, lesion characteristics, clinical findings, treatments, blood tests, and outcomes. Severity scores (SCORTEN, Re-SCORTEN, ABCD-10) were used for treatment evaluation and mortality prediction. Data were statistically analyzed, and significant factors associated with mortality were identified. We found that among the 28 patients, 89.2% had comorbidities, mainly cardiovascular diseases, and 21.4% had autoimmune disorders. All patients had received systemic therapy (46.6% monotherapy, 53.6% combination therapy), with systemic steroids (71.4%) and intravenous immunoglobulins (67.8%) being common treatments. There were complications, including systemic infections (67.9%) and septic shock (10.7%). The overall mortality rate was 17.8%. The statistical analysis indicated that malignancy, a high ABCD-10 score, and a high neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were significantly associated with mortality. The extent of affected body surface area did not correlate significantly with mortality. This study provides insights into SJS/TEN management, revealing factors influencing mortality in a high-complexity tertiary hospital setting.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: 11-year retrospective experience in a high-complexity tertiary hospital in Milan, Italy / Schroeder, J. W.; Caputo, V.; Guida, S.; Conte, F.; Paolino, G.; Bonoldi, E.; Baruffaldi Preis, F. W.; Rongioletti, F.. - In: CLINICS IN DERMATOLOGY. - ISSN 0738-081X. - 41:6(2023), pp. 712-720. [10.1016/j.clindermatol.2023.09.014]

Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: 11-year retrospective experience in a high-complexity tertiary hospital in Milan, Italy

Guida S.;Conte F.;Paolino G.;Rongioletti F.
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions characterized by widespread epidermal necrosis, mucous membrane erosions, and systemic findings. We have provided our 11-year experience from a Milan, Italy tertiary hospital managing SJS/TEN, evaluating the clinical and histopathologic features plus the impact on mortality. We retrospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with SJS/TEN based on the clinical and histopathologic findings, according to the classification criteria of multiple studies. We assessed the dermatographics, comorbidities, drug history, lesion characteristics, clinical findings, treatments, blood tests, and outcomes. Severity scores (SCORTEN, Re-SCORTEN, ABCD-10) were used for treatment evaluation and mortality prediction. Data were statistically analyzed, and significant factors associated with mortality were identified. We found that among the 28 patients, 89.2% had comorbidities, mainly cardiovascular diseases, and 21.4% had autoimmune disorders. All patients had received systemic therapy (46.6% monotherapy, 53.6% combination therapy), with systemic steroids (71.4%) and intravenous immunoglobulins (67.8%) being common treatments. There were complications, including systemic infections (67.9%) and septic shock (10.7%). The overall mortality rate was 17.8%. The statistical analysis indicated that malignancy, a high ABCD-10 score, and a high neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were significantly associated with mortality. The extent of affected body surface area did not correlate significantly with mortality. This study provides insights into SJS/TEN management, revealing factors influencing mortality in a high-complexity tertiary hospital setting.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/155618
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