In this work, we investigated motor network structure in patients affected by essential tremor (ET) with or without resting tremor, using probabilistic tractography of the cerebello-thalamo-basal ganglia-cortical loop. Twenty-five patients with ET, twenty-two patients with ET associated with resting tremor (rET), and twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. All participants underwent whole-brain 3D T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, and DAT-SPECT. Probabilistic tractography was performed on diffusion data in network mode, reconstructing connections between the different structures of the cerebello-thalamo-basal ganglia-cortical loop. All patients with ET, regardless of the presence of resting tremor, had normal DAT-SPECT, but showed significantly decreased connectivity in the cerebello-thalamo-precentral cortex network bilaterally, compared to healthy controls. In addition, patients with rET showed reduced connectivity in a pathway connecting globus pallidus, caudate, and supplementary motor area, compared to ET and controls. This latter circuit was significantly damaged in the hemisphere contralateral to the side clinically most affected by resting tremor. These findings provide insights upon structural changes underlying the different clinical presentations of ET. Our study demonstrates that ET and rET share common alterations in the cerebello-thalamo-precentral cortex circuit, while rET patients are characterized by specific damage to additional structures of motor network, such as globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, and supplementary motor area. Our findings suggest that ET and rET are different subtypes of the same neurodegenerative disorder

Structural connectivity differences in essential tremor with and without resting tremor / 51., Caligiuri ME; Arabia, G; Barbagallo, G; Lupo, A; Morelli, M; Nisticò, R; Novellino, F; Quattrone, A; Salsone, M; Vescio, B; Cherubini, A; Quattrone, A. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 0340-5354. - (2017).

Structural connectivity differences in essential tremor with and without resting tremor

Salsone M;
2017-01-01

Abstract

In this work, we investigated motor network structure in patients affected by essential tremor (ET) with or without resting tremor, using probabilistic tractography of the cerebello-thalamo-basal ganglia-cortical loop. Twenty-five patients with ET, twenty-two patients with ET associated with resting tremor (rET), and twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. All participants underwent whole-brain 3D T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, and DAT-SPECT. Probabilistic tractography was performed on diffusion data in network mode, reconstructing connections between the different structures of the cerebello-thalamo-basal ganglia-cortical loop. All patients with ET, regardless of the presence of resting tremor, had normal DAT-SPECT, but showed significantly decreased connectivity in the cerebello-thalamo-precentral cortex network bilaterally, compared to healthy controls. In addition, patients with rET showed reduced connectivity in a pathway connecting globus pallidus, caudate, and supplementary motor area, compared to ET and controls. This latter circuit was significantly damaged in the hemisphere contralateral to the side clinically most affected by resting tremor. These findings provide insights upon structural changes underlying the different clinical presentations of ET. Our study demonstrates that ET and rET share common alterations in the cerebello-thalamo-precentral cortex circuit, while rET patients are characterized by specific damage to additional structures of motor network, such as globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, and supplementary motor area. Our findings suggest that ET and rET are different subtypes of the same neurodegenerative disorder
2017
Cerebello–thalamo–cortical damage
DWI
Globus pallidus
MRI
Tremor
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/158699
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