Using fMRI, an increased recruitment of the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC), supplementary motor area, and middle frontal gyrus has been detected in patients with cervical cord myelitis of possible demyelinating origin. The aim of this study was to evaluate, using fMRI, whether the level of cord involvement influences cortical reorganization by comparing patients with isolated myelitis of the cervical and the dorsal portions of the cord, and to investigate whether the extent of cortical reorganization is associated with the extent of cervical cord pathology measured using magnetization transfer (NIT) MRI. We studied 24 right-handed patients (14 with a previous involvement of the cervical cord and 10 with an involvement of the dorsal cord) in a chronic and clinically stable phase following an isolated myelitis of possible demyelinating origin and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. During a single session, we obtained fMRI during repetitive flexion-extension of the last four ringers of the right and left hands and cervical cord NIT MRI. Average cord MTR was lower in patients with cervical (P < 0.0001) and dorsal (P = 0.0001) myelitis than in controls. Compared to controls and for both tasks, patients with myelitis had an increased recruitment of the ipsilateral primary SMC, which was independent of the level of cord involvement. On the contrary, patients with cervical myelitis had a more widespread recruitment of frontal and parietal regions, whereas those with dorsal myelitis had a more widespread recruitment of temporal and cerebellar regions. Strong correlations (r values ranging front -0.72 to -0.88) were found between relative activations of cortical areas and the severity of cervical cord damage. Patients with isolated myelitis have different patterns of movement-associated cortical activations according to the level of cord involvement. This "level-dependent" functional reorganization of the cortex is likely to have an adaptive role in limiting the clinical outcome of cord damage and should be considered when designing rehabilitation strategies for these patients. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

The level of spinal cord involvement influences the pattern of movement-associated cortical recruitment in patients with isolated myelitis

Rocca MA;Agosta F;Falini A;Comi G;Filippi M
2006

Abstract

Using fMRI, an increased recruitment of the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC), supplementary motor area, and middle frontal gyrus has been detected in patients with cervical cord myelitis of possible demyelinating origin. The aim of this study was to evaluate, using fMRI, whether the level of cord involvement influences cortical reorganization by comparing patients with isolated myelitis of the cervical and the dorsal portions of the cord, and to investigate whether the extent of cortical reorganization is associated with the extent of cervical cord pathology measured using magnetization transfer (NIT) MRI. We studied 24 right-handed patients (14 with a previous involvement of the cervical cord and 10 with an involvement of the dorsal cord) in a chronic and clinically stable phase following an isolated myelitis of possible demyelinating origin and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. During a single session, we obtained fMRI during repetitive flexion-extension of the last four ringers of the right and left hands and cervical cord NIT MRI. Average cord MTR was lower in patients with cervical (P < 0.0001) and dorsal (P = 0.0001) myelitis than in controls. Compared to controls and for both tasks, patients with myelitis had an increased recruitment of the ipsilateral primary SMC, which was independent of the level of cord involvement. On the contrary, patients with cervical myelitis had a more widespread recruitment of frontal and parietal regions, whereas those with dorsal myelitis had a more widespread recruitment of temporal and cerebellar regions. Strong correlations (r values ranging front -0.72 to -0.88) were found between relative activations of cortical areas and the severity of cervical cord damage. Patients with isolated myelitis have different patterns of movement-associated cortical activations according to the level of cord involvement. This "level-dependent" functional reorganization of the cortex is likely to have an adaptive role in limiting the clinical outcome of cord damage and should be considered when designing rehabilitation strategies for these patients. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/2354
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