Background Thalassemia major can be cured with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Persistent mixed chimerism develops in around 10% of transplanted thalassemic patients, but the biological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood Design and Methods The presence of interleukin-10-producing T cells in the peripheral blood of eight patients with persistent mixed chimerism and five with full donor chimerism was investigated A detailed characterization was then performed; by T-cell cloning, of the effector and regulatory T-cell repertoire of one patient with persistent mixed chimerism, who developed stable split erythroid/lymphoid chimerism after a hematopoietic stern cell transplant from an HLA-matched unrelated donor Results Higher levels of interleukin-10 were produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with persistent mixed chimerism than by the same cells from patients with complete donor chimerism or normal donors. T-cell clones of both host and donor origin could be isolated from the peripheral blood of one, selected patient with persistent mixed chimerism. Together with effector T-cell clones reactive against host or donor alloantigens, regulatory T-cell clones with a cytokine secretion profile typical of type 1 regulatory cells were identified at high frequencies Type 1 regulatory cell clones, of both donor and host origin, were able to inhibit the function of effector T cells of either donor or host origin m Vitro Conclusions Overall these results suggest that interleukin-10 and type 1 regulatory cells are associated with persistent mixed chimerism and may play an important role in sustaining long-term tolerance in vivo. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of peripheral tolerance in chimeric patients and support the use of cellular therapy with regulatory T cells Following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Type 1 regulatory T cells are associated with persistent split erythroid/lymphoid chimerism after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for thalassemia

RONCAROLO , MARIA GRAZIA;
2009

Abstract

Background Thalassemia major can be cured with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Persistent mixed chimerism develops in around 10% of transplanted thalassemic patients, but the biological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood Design and Methods The presence of interleukin-10-producing T cells in the peripheral blood of eight patients with persistent mixed chimerism and five with full donor chimerism was investigated A detailed characterization was then performed; by T-cell cloning, of the effector and regulatory T-cell repertoire of one patient with persistent mixed chimerism, who developed stable split erythroid/lymphoid chimerism after a hematopoietic stern cell transplant from an HLA-matched unrelated donor Results Higher levels of interleukin-10 were produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with persistent mixed chimerism than by the same cells from patients with complete donor chimerism or normal donors. T-cell clones of both host and donor origin could be isolated from the peripheral blood of one, selected patient with persistent mixed chimerism. Together with effector T-cell clones reactive against host or donor alloantigens, regulatory T-cell clones with a cytokine secretion profile typical of type 1 regulatory cells were identified at high frequencies Type 1 regulatory cell clones, of both donor and host origin, were able to inhibit the function of effector T cells of either donor or host origin m Vitro Conclusions Overall these results suggest that interleukin-10 and type 1 regulatory cells are associated with persistent mixed chimerism and may play an important role in sustaining long-term tolerance in vivo. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of peripheral tolerance in chimeric patients and support the use of cellular therapy with regulatory T cells Following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/5438
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