Antibodies against phosphotyrosine are a powerful tool with which to identify proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, such as viral oncogene-encoded transforming proteins and their cellular protein substrates. Probed on human leukemia cell lines, phosphotyrosine antibodies recognized a 210,000-molecular-weight protein (p210) in K562 cells, a cell line derived from a Philadelphia (Ph)'-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), but recognized no protein in control Ph'-negative non-CML leukemia cells. The p210 protein was also recognized by antisera against v-abl-encoded polypeptides and displayed kinase activity, phosphorylating itself on tyrosine, in an immunocomplex kinase assay. These data are consistent with reported findings of the expression of a recombined bcr-abl gene in Ph'-positive CML cells, leading to the synthesis of an altered p210c-abl protein endowed with tyrosine kinase activity. Phosphotyrosine antibodies also detected the expression of the p210c-abl protein in fresh bone marrow cells harvested from CML patients in blast crisis. Besides the p210c-abl protein kinase, phosphotyrosine antibodies recognized other proteins with molecular weights of 110,000, 68,000, and 36,000 (p110, p68, and p36) in K562 cells. When [gamma-32P]ATP was added to nonionic detergent-extracted cells, these proteins became phosphorylated on tyrosine, as confirmed by phosphoamino acid analysis. A comparison with fibroblasts transformed by the v-abl, v-src, and v-fps oncogenes suggested the identity of the p36 protein with the common 36-kilodalton protein substrate of viral oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins is thus a feature shared by cells transformed by v-abl and cells expressing a rearranged bcr-abl gene.

Phosphotyrosine antibodies identify the p210c-abl tyrosine kinase and proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

NALDINI , LUIGI;
1986

Abstract

Antibodies against phosphotyrosine are a powerful tool with which to identify proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, such as viral oncogene-encoded transforming proteins and their cellular protein substrates. Probed on human leukemia cell lines, phosphotyrosine antibodies recognized a 210,000-molecular-weight protein (p210) in K562 cells, a cell line derived from a Philadelphia (Ph)'-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), but recognized no protein in control Ph'-negative non-CML leukemia cells. The p210 protein was also recognized by antisera against v-abl-encoded polypeptides and displayed kinase activity, phosphorylating itself on tyrosine, in an immunocomplex kinase assay. These data are consistent with reported findings of the expression of a recombined bcr-abl gene in Ph'-positive CML cells, leading to the synthesis of an altered p210c-abl protein endowed with tyrosine kinase activity. Phosphotyrosine antibodies also detected the expression of the p210c-abl protein in fresh bone marrow cells harvested from CML patients in blast crisis. Besides the p210c-abl protein kinase, phosphotyrosine antibodies recognized other proteins with molecular weights of 110,000, 68,000, and 36,000 (p110, p68, and p36) in K562 cells. When [gamma-32P]ATP was added to nonionic detergent-extracted cells, these proteins became phosphorylated on tyrosine, as confirmed by phosphoamino acid analysis. A comparison with fibroblasts transformed by the v-abl, v-src, and v-fps oncogenes suggested the identity of the p36 protein with the common 36-kilodalton protein substrate of viral oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins is thus a feature shared by cells transformed by v-abl and cells expressing a rearranged bcr-abl gene.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/5653
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact