Purpose: Following PRK, a regression or the appearance of haze is often observed. This type of problem may be caused by an anomalous response by the stroma, probably mediated by keratocytes. Controlling keratocyte apoptosis therefore affects the outcome and stability of PRK. Inhibiting the transmission of the apoptosis signal from the damaged corneal epithelium to the keratocytes attenuates cell activation. This can be achieved by using a systemic product that will control the release of the mediators of the inflammation and stimulate tear production. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to test the effects of a supplement containing omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic and (-linolenic acid), (-carotene, group B vitamins and trace elements (copper, zinc), when administered both before and after PRK. Methods: Eighty subjects undergoing PRK were randomly divided into two groups. The group treated with omega-6 fatty acids included 18 females and 22 males, with a mean age of 32 years; the control group comprised 20 females and 20 males (mean age, 30 years). Statistical evaluation of the results was carried out on Schirmer test and fluorescein staining values and the state of the epithelium. Results: In the Schirmer tests, a comparison between the two groups of patients who underwent surgery (groups 1 and 2) showed a statistically significant difference after 7, 15, and 30 days' treatment in favor of the group treated with omega-6 fatty acids. The values relating to the fluorescein staining test and the state of the epithelium showed a statistically significant difference in favor of the group treated with omega-6 fatty acids. Conclusion: These results confirm the real advantages of using omega-6 essential fatty acids to optimize and stabilize the outcome of PRK.

Efficacy of omega-6 essential fatty acid treatment before and after photorefractive keratectomy

QUERQUES , GIUSEPPE;
2008

Abstract

Purpose: Following PRK, a regression or the appearance of haze is often observed. This type of problem may be caused by an anomalous response by the stroma, probably mediated by keratocytes. Controlling keratocyte apoptosis therefore affects the outcome and stability of PRK. Inhibiting the transmission of the apoptosis signal from the damaged corneal epithelium to the keratocytes attenuates cell activation. This can be achieved by using a systemic product that will control the release of the mediators of the inflammation and stimulate tear production. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to test the effects of a supplement containing omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic and (-linolenic acid), (-carotene, group B vitamins and trace elements (copper, zinc), when administered both before and after PRK. Methods: Eighty subjects undergoing PRK were randomly divided into two groups. The group treated with omega-6 fatty acids included 18 females and 22 males, with a mean age of 32 years; the control group comprised 20 females and 20 males (mean age, 30 years). Statistical evaluation of the results was carried out on Schirmer test and fluorescein staining values and the state of the epithelium. Results: In the Schirmer tests, a comparison between the two groups of patients who underwent surgery (groups 1 and 2) showed a statistically significant difference after 7, 15, and 30 days' treatment in favor of the group treated with omega-6 fatty acids. The values relating to the fluorescein staining test and the state of the epithelium showed a statistically significant difference in favor of the group treated with omega-6 fatty acids. Conclusion: These results confirm the real advantages of using omega-6 essential fatty acids to optimize and stabilize the outcome of PRK.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/5955
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