A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen was investigated in 45 patients with hematologic malignancies who were considered poor candidates for conventional myeloablative regimens. Median patient age was 49 years. Twenty-six patients previously failed autologous transplantation, and 18 patients had a refractory disease at the time of transplantation. In order to decrease nonrelapse mortality, and enhance the graft-versus-tumor effect, a program was designed in which a reduced conditioning with thiotepa, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide was associated with programmed reinfusions of donor lymphocytes for patients without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), not achieving clinical and molecular remission after transplantation. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Seventeen patients received marrow, cells and 28 received mobilize hematopoietic cells. All patients engrafted. The probability of grades II-IV and III-IV acute GVHD were 47% and 13%, respectively. The probability of nonrelapse mortality, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 13%, 57%, and 53%, respectively., Thirteen patients in complete remission had a polymerase chain reaction marker for minimal disease monitoring; 10 achieved molecular remission after transplantation. Nine patients received donor lymphocytes: one patient with mantle cell lymphoma had a minimal response, one patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation achieved complete remission, and 7 patients did not respond. At a median follow-up of 385 days (range, 24 to 820 days), 25 patients (55%) were alive in complete remission. Although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the longterm outcome, the study shows that this regimen is associated with a durable engraftment, has a low nonrelapse mortality rate, and can induce clinical and molecular remissions.

Reduced-intensity conditioning followed by allografting of hematopoietic cells can produce clinical and molecular remissions in patients with poor-risk hematologic malignancies

CICERI , FABIO;BORDIGNON , CLAUDIO;
2002

Abstract

A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen was investigated in 45 patients with hematologic malignancies who were considered poor candidates for conventional myeloablative regimens. Median patient age was 49 years. Twenty-six patients previously failed autologous transplantation, and 18 patients had a refractory disease at the time of transplantation. In order to decrease nonrelapse mortality, and enhance the graft-versus-tumor effect, a program was designed in which a reduced conditioning with thiotepa, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide was associated with programmed reinfusions of donor lymphocytes for patients without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), not achieving clinical and molecular remission after transplantation. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Seventeen patients received marrow, cells and 28 received mobilize hematopoietic cells. All patients engrafted. The probability of grades II-IV and III-IV acute GVHD were 47% and 13%, respectively. The probability of nonrelapse mortality, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 13%, 57%, and 53%, respectively., Thirteen patients in complete remission had a polymerase chain reaction marker for minimal disease monitoring; 10 achieved molecular remission after transplantation. Nine patients received donor lymphocytes: one patient with mantle cell lymphoma had a minimal response, one patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation achieved complete remission, and 7 patients did not respond. At a median follow-up of 385 days (range, 24 to 820 days), 25 patients (55%) were alive in complete remission. Although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the longterm outcome, the study shows that this regimen is associated with a durable engraftment, has a low nonrelapse mortality rate, and can induce clinical and molecular remissions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/6518
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