Background Myocardial hibernation may result from repetitive episodes of transient ischaemia leading to prolonged dysfunction. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression has been demonstrated in animals following brief, non-lethal ischaemia-reperfusion injury. We therefore, hypothesised that in human hibernating myocardium: 1) iNOS would be present; 2) the reaction of nitric oxide and superoxide would form the strong oxidant peroxynitrite; 3) that this process would be accompanied by the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) which interacts with NOS and whose products could further affect myocardial function. Method and results In sixteen patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular biopsies were obtained from chronically dysfunctional segments subtended by a stenotic artery (> 75 %) and shown to be viable by F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Comparison was made with myocardial biopsies (n = 8) from normally contracting myocardium in patients undergoing coronary surgery, from unused transplant donors and at post-mortem. Regional wall motion score improved in all patients 6 months post-revascularisation (from 2.7 +/- 0.7 to 1.5 +/- 0.5; p < 0.001), confirming hibernation. Immunocytochemistry localized reactivity to iNOS, Cox-2 and nitrotyrosine (a marker of peroxynitrite formation) to cardiomyocytes from hibernating segments. No difference in reactivity to endothelial NOS was seen between hibernating and control cardiomyocytes. Conclusion Cox-2 and iNOS are co-expressed in hibernating myocardium with nitrotyrosine suggesting nitric oxide production and peroxynitrite formation. We propose that this is secondary to ischaemia-reperfusion and that the products of these enzymes may have consequences for myocardial contractile function and survival.

Immunocytochemical evidence for inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression with nitrotyrosine formation in human hibernating myocardium

CAMICI , PAOLO
2002

Abstract

Background Myocardial hibernation may result from repetitive episodes of transient ischaemia leading to prolonged dysfunction. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression has been demonstrated in animals following brief, non-lethal ischaemia-reperfusion injury. We therefore, hypothesised that in human hibernating myocardium: 1) iNOS would be present; 2) the reaction of nitric oxide and superoxide would form the strong oxidant peroxynitrite; 3) that this process would be accompanied by the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) which interacts with NOS and whose products could further affect myocardial function. Method and results In sixteen patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular biopsies were obtained from chronically dysfunctional segments subtended by a stenotic artery (> 75 %) and shown to be viable by F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Comparison was made with myocardial biopsies (n = 8) from normally contracting myocardium in patients undergoing coronary surgery, from unused transplant donors and at post-mortem. Regional wall motion score improved in all patients 6 months post-revascularisation (from 2.7 +/- 0.7 to 1.5 +/- 0.5; p < 0.001), confirming hibernation. Immunocytochemistry localized reactivity to iNOS, Cox-2 and nitrotyrosine (a marker of peroxynitrite formation) to cardiomyocytes from hibernating segments. No difference in reactivity to endothelial NOS was seen between hibernating and control cardiomyocytes. Conclusion Cox-2 and iNOS are co-expressed in hibernating myocardium with nitrotyrosine suggesting nitric oxide production and peroxynitrite formation. We propose that this is secondary to ischaemia-reperfusion and that the products of these enzymes may have consequences for myocardial contractile function and survival.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/7479
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