Synapsins (Syns) are a family of phosphoproteins associated with synaptic vesicles (SVs). Their main function is to regulate neurotransmitter release by maintaining a reserve pool of SVs at the presynaptic terminal. Previous studies reported that the deletion of one or more Syn genes in mice results in an epileptic phenotype and autism-related behavioral abnormalities. Here we aimed at characterizing the behavioral phenotype and neurobiological correlates of the deletion of Syns in a Syn triple knockout (TKO) mouse model. Wild type (WT) and TKO mice were tested in the open field, novelty suppressed feeding, light-dark box, forced swim, tail suspension and three-chamber sociability tests. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we recorded the spontaneous activity of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Levels of 5-HT and DA in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of WT and TKO mice were also assessed using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. TKO mice displayed hyperactivity and impaired social and anxiety-like behavior. Behavioral dysfunctions were accompanied by reduced firing activity of DRN 5-HT, but not VTA DA, neurons. TKO mice also showed increased responsiveness of DRN 5-HT-1A autoreceptors, measured as a reduced dose of the 5-HT-1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT necessary to inhibit DRN 5-HT firing activity by 50%. Finally, hippocampal 5-HT levels were lower in TKO than in WT mice. Overall, Syns deletion in mice leads to a reduction in DRN 5-HT firing activity and hippocampal 5-HT levels along with behavioral alterations reminiscent of human neuropsychiatric conditions associated with Syn dysfunction.

Dysfunction of the serotonergic system in the brain of synapsin triple knockout mice is associated with behavioral abnormalities resembling synapsin-related human pathologies

Guarnieri F. C.;Valtorta F.
Penultimo
;
Comai S.
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

Synapsins (Syns) are a family of phosphoproteins associated with synaptic vesicles (SVs). Their main function is to regulate neurotransmitter release by maintaining a reserve pool of SVs at the presynaptic terminal. Previous studies reported that the deletion of one or more Syn genes in mice results in an epileptic phenotype and autism-related behavioral abnormalities. Here we aimed at characterizing the behavioral phenotype and neurobiological correlates of the deletion of Syns in a Syn triple knockout (TKO) mouse model. Wild type (WT) and TKO mice were tested in the open field, novelty suppressed feeding, light-dark box, forced swim, tail suspension and three-chamber sociability tests. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we recorded the spontaneous activity of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Levels of 5-HT and DA in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of WT and TKO mice were also assessed using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. TKO mice displayed hyperactivity and impaired social and anxiety-like behavior. Behavioral dysfunctions were accompanied by reduced firing activity of DRN 5-HT, but not VTA DA, neurons. TKO mice also showed increased responsiveness of DRN 5-HT-1A autoreceptors, measured as a reduced dose of the 5-HT-1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT necessary to inhibit DRN 5-HT firing activity by 50%. Finally, hippocampal 5-HT levels were lower in TKO than in WT mice. Overall, Syns deletion in mice leads to a reduction in DRN 5-HT firing activity and hippocampal 5-HT levels along with behavioral alterations reminiscent of human neuropsychiatric conditions associated with Syn dysfunction.
Anxiety-like behavior
Dopamine
Hyperlocomotion
Serotonin
Sociability
Synapsin triple knockout mice
Action Potentials
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Brain
Dopamine
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Neurons
Serotonin
Synapsins
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11768/132355
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